Bhutan Travel Information

Share with friends:

Accommodation
In the major towns such as Thimpu, Paro, and Phuentsoling, comfortable hotels await the visitor, while in smaller towns, modest, but adequate, hotels, lodges and guest houses are available. Your tour agent should ensure that the best available accommodations are arranged for you. The Tourism Authority of Bhutan (TAB), regulates hotel standards and all travel regulations in Bhutan. The cost of the accommodations are included in the tour cost.

Food and Drink
Traditional Bhutanese food is hot and spicy. For our visitors, however, Chinese, Indian, and Continental fares are served. The more adventurous can try the local delicacies like the tasty, but fiery, ematatshi, the national dish of Bhutan, made with red chillis and cottage cheese. Meals are normally served buffet style in the hotels. On trekking tours, we serve simple but nutritious and tasty dishes, freshly cooked by our trained cooks. The daily tour cost includes all meals while in Bhutan as well as other services, including trekking arrangements, as required. Your only extra expenses will be mineral water, liquor, laundry, souvenirs and optional tips to the guide, driver and hotel staff.

Transport
We use comfortable and safe Japanese cars, jeeps, vans and coaches to transport our guests. The cost of transport is already included in the daily tour cost. All our drivers are fully trained in safety and are well experienced in driving in Bhutan. You will find that you are more comfortable driving through the winding hilly roads of Bhutan, where sane driving prevails, and drivers are unusually courteous to each other, unlike in some of the neighboring countries.

Guides
All tourist groups will be accompanied throughout their stay in Bhutan by an English-speaking guide and have a vehicle and driver at your disposal at all times. All of our guides are trained by the Tourism Authority of Bhutan (TAB) and licensed by the Government. Our trekking guides and cooks undergoe an additional mountain guide training, including safety and first aid instruction. TAB has received assistance from the Austrian Government in the form of trainers and funds to establish the training programs for tourist guides.

Essential Extras
There are several things that you should carry to make a trip to Bhutan more comfortable. All of the following items are essential:A folding umbrella; especially if traveling during the monsoons. Rain is possible any time, and is almost certain from June through August.Be sure to carry ear plugs (and spares) to reduce the noise from the barking dogs at night. There are a lot of dogs in Bhutan as the Bhutanese love dogs.There are occasional electric outages throughout the country; so you should always keep a torch (flashlight) beside your bed.Carry a pair of sunglasses (as protection from high altitude glare).A Swiss army knife has many uses, such as cutting cheese and opening bottles.Bring a small clock with an alarm to help you wake up, because not all hotel rooms have telephones.

Packing
If you are on a cultural tour, it\'s OK to bring a hard suitcase, though a soft bag is more versatile and easier to pack into the luggage space of a vehicle. For those trekking in Bhutan a strong duffel bag as luggage is best. You will also want a small rucksack (back pack) or waist pack to carry your camera, water bottle and other essentials in the vehicle and when you are walking around town or visiting monuments.

PRE DEPARTURE INFORMATION
Once your tour or trek in Bhutan is confirmed we will provide you with a detailed Pre Departure Information packet which contains a list of recommended clothing and equipment along with many other details that will help you prepare for you tour/trek in Bhutan.
People and ReligionBhutan’s indigenous population is the Drukpa. The three main ethnic groups, the Sharchops, the Ngalops and the Lhotshampas (of Nepalese origin) make up today’s Drukpa. The national language is Dzongkha. The Buddhist faith has played and continues to play a fundamental role in the cultural, ethical and sociological development of Bhutan and its people. It permeates all strands of secular life. Bringing with it a reverence for the land and its well being. Annual Tsechus and Dromchoes are spiritual occasions in each district. Throughout Bhutan, stupas and chortens line in the roadside commemorating a holy place. Prayer flags are found fluttering on long poles maintaining a constant communications with the heavens. Bhutan retains the Tantric form of Mahayana Buddhism as its official religion.



< Go back to package...


 Payments secured via:



© 2003-2017 Tibet Holidays


Affiliated with: